Bert & Peg Taylor

Bert and Peg Taylor recall their time in 1920’s/30’s Ship Street, Gordon Road and Bert’s wartime experiences during the retreat from Dunkirk.

Bert & Peg Taylor Part 1
Bert & Peg Taylor Part 2

Paul Plumb

The Life of Paul Redgrave Plumb 1924 – 2012

Written by Nick Redgrave Plumb for his father’s funeral ceremony in 2012

Paul Plumb

Paul was born on November 22nd 1924 to Daisy Ellen Plumb (formerly Barnes) and Ernest Redgrave Plumb at 27, Queens Place in Shoreham. He had an older brother Allen and sister Doris. 

When he came into the world Doris immediately sent brother Allen to the Post Office (just over the road) where his Dad worked to tell him the good news. Allen ran all the way, so when he arrived he was completely out of puff and could hardly speak, but through the panting managed to say ….”It’s here!”. Paul had a thick mop of golden curls until the age of about 3. He remembered having a huge pram with big wheels & canopy and being pushed along by his sister Doris.

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Victoria Road School 1950’s

Following on from the popularity of the 1946 class group photograph from Middle Road School, we now have wonderful images from Victoria Road School in 1949 and and 1953. These were given to us by Jenny Elton who lived up the road in Mill Lane. Can you put a name to any of the children?

1953: Victoria Road School upper playground. Click to expand.

Jenny can remember some of the names and recounts: “First left Brian McIntyre who in later life was the school caretaker. 2nd from right Tom Blundell, now Sir Tom, Professor of Chemistry, Oxford Fellow of the Royal Society etc. Interestingly his younger  brother Roger is also a Sir (Economics). The tallest boy in the back row, Roger Brann was a St. Wilfrid boy and together with Tom were the class brain boxes.

Photo of the 1949 Percussion band at Victoria Road. (Jenny is in the back row 1st left)

You’ll find a detailed article on Victoria Road Infants and Junior Schools here.

One Day, One Year, One Place

A study of the inhabitants of Mill Lane, Shoreham in 1939.

written by Jenny Elton

Following the onset of war in September in 1939 a Register was taken of the civilian population with the purpose of producing a National Identity card. Later it was to become multifunctional, first as an aid in the use of ration cards and later helping officials to record the movement of the civilian population over the following decades. From 1948 it formed the basis for the National Health Service Register. The data was collected on 29th September 1939.The following information was listed. Name, gender, date of birth, marital status, occupation, and whether a visitor, servant, patient, inmate or inferred family member and other members of the household. 

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