Napoleonic Army Camps

Military copy

During the Napoleonic Wars the threat of invasion by the French caused Britain to strengthen its defences along the south coast in readiness. Initially, more troops were redeployed to the south followed later by other defensive precautions such as the Martello Towers that were built along the Kent and East Sussex coasts. Barracks and camps were set up, most were intended only as temporary accommodation for the troops but the one along the Lewes Road near Brighton became permanent and survived into the 20th century as Preston Barracks. There were others further inland but the local coastal camps were at Blatchington (Hove), Southwick, Steyning, New Shoreham and Worthing. Continue reading “Napoleonic Army Camps”

Shoreham Fort

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Shoreham Fort (aka Redoubt or Battery) and its Garrison

In the years of peace that had followed the Napoleonic Wars many felt that the country had neglected its military and coastal defences. Despite an alliance with France to defend Turkey against Russia in 1854 reports of ‘menaces towards England of certain French officers’ caused national alarm and an almost irrational fear of invasion. In response the Government reintroduced the 1804 volunteer movement of local militia and made it a permanent reserve of the country’s military force. Continue reading “Shoreham Fort”

CHALK – A History of Shoreham (Beeding) Cement Works

During the 1950’s cycle rides to Bramber castle were a regular outing for us kids but mostly via the Coombes/Botolphs route. It was far more interesting that way with its winding road and steep hills, each hard climb being rewarded with an exhilarating race down the other side – this in the days when there was little traffic about, particularly on that road. Continue reading “CHALK – A History of Shoreham (Beeding) Cement Works”

Along the Beach at Bungalow Town

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Along the Beach at Bungalow Town.

Ever wondered where those bungalows pictured in Shoreham’s old postcards were? Relive the view our predecessors saw and even meet them by joining our celebrated Shoreham Time Walks. See those wooden structures as they once were, some little more than simple wood and corrugated iron shacks, others extravagant and imaginative in design. Those wishing to participate should present themselves promptly at 1pm at the east end of Widewater on Saturday 10th August in any year between 1900 and 1920………………………. Continue reading “Along the Beach at Bungalow Town”

Blockade Coastguard Station

Description: Blockhouse Beach Lawns Blockhouse

THE BLOCKADE/COASTGUARD STATION AT SHOREHAM

The Blockade (or “Preventative”) Service was created in 1817 following the country’s huge loss of revenue due to what was then considered by some to be a lack of success by the Customs and Revenue Services in coping with the smuggling problem. It is perhaps unfair to lay the blame for this entirely upon them as, amongst other things, we know that manpower was short compared with the smuggling gangs they came up against; pay was poor and even the ships they used were invariably slower and less well armed than the smugglers’ own vessels. Continue reading “Blockade Coastguard Station”

The Opening of the Shoreham Branch Railway

Trestle Bridge

The Opening of the Shoreham Branch Railway Line 1840

It is not generally appreciated (except by railway history enthusiasts) that before the formation of the London, Brighton and South Coast Railway proper (1846), the railway line to Shoreham (initially the line ended here and was not extended to Worthing until 1845) was the first part of the then London & Brighton Railway to be opened (1840) for traffic – one year before the line from Brighton to Haywards Heath and eventually to London. Continue reading “The Opening of the Shoreham Branch Railway”

The Vinery

The Vinery, 1 – 3 St.Mary’s Road, Shoreham

-what fate awaits this rare architectural gem?

 

During the 20th century the name ‘Vinery’ had long since been associated with the house itself but in fact originated from the covered walkway that once stood between the road and the front door of the property. The house has been variously described as having been built in the late Regency period or the second quarter of the 19th century and was a large building situated to the east of and adjacent to St.Mary’s House on the north east corner of the graveyard. It was a building of two houses – in total known as ‘Brighton House’ in the 1870’s but by the 1890’s the west half became known as ‘The Vinery’ with the other half retaining the original name. Continue reading “The Vinery”

Blind Fanny Winton

Description: Macintosh HD:Users:rogerbateman:Desktop:ZFanny Winton:89.446 copy.jpg

Description: Macintosh HD:Users:rogerbateman:Desktop:ZFanny Winton:IMG_20151120_0003fb.jpg

 

I’ve known about Old Shoreham’s blind Fanny Winton for many years but never got round to reading Martha Rigden’s account in her 1873 book ‘By A Way They Knew Not.’

 

In clearing some old papers recently I discovered this anonymous resume of the book that condenses Fanny’s story of a hard life, going blind, travelling to Brighton for (somewhat harsh) treatment, bedridden for 30 years etc., and also tells us a little of the area and the people in it.

 

Continue reading “Blind Fanny Winton”