Napoleonic Army Camps

Military copy

During the Napoleonic Wars the threat of invasion by the French caused Britain to strengthen its defences along the south coast in readiness. Initially, more troops were redeployed to the south followed later by other defensive precautions such as the Martello Towers that were built along the Kent and East Sussex coasts. Barracks and camps were set up, most were intended only as temporary accommodation for the troops but the one along the Lewes Road near Brighton became permanent and survived into the 20th century as Preston Barracks. There were others further inland but the local coastal camps were at Blatchington (Hove), Southwick, Steyning, New Shoreham and Worthing. Continue reading “Napoleonic Army Camps”

Shoreham Fort

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Shoreham Fort (aka Redoubt or Battery) and its Garrison

In the years of peace that had followed the Napoleonic Wars many felt that the country had neglected its military and coastal defences. Despite an alliance with France to defend Turkey against Russia in 1854 reports of ‘menaces towards England of certain French officers’ caused national alarm and an almost irrational fear of invasion. In response the Government reintroduced the 1804 volunteer movement of local militia and made it a permanent reserve of the country’s military force. Continue reading “Shoreham Fort”

CHALK – A History of Shoreham (Beeding) Cement Works

During the 1950’s cycle rides to Bramber castle were a regular outing for us kids but mostly via the Coombes/Botolphs route. It was far more interesting that way with its winding road and steep hills, each hard climb being rewarded with an exhilarating race down the other side – this in the days when there was little traffic about, particularly on that road. Continue reading “CHALK – A History of Shoreham (Beeding) Cement Works”

Along the Beach at Bungalow Town

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Along the Beach at Bungalow Town.

Ever wondered where those bungalows pictured in Shoreham’s old postcards were? Relive the view our predecessors saw and even meet them by joining our celebrated Shoreham Time Walks. See those wooden structures as they once were, some little more than simple wood and corrugated iron shacks, others extravagant and imaginative in design. Those wishing to participate should present themselves promptly at 1pm at the east end of Widewater on Saturday 10th August in any year between 1900 and 1920………………………. Continue reading “Along the Beach at Bungalow Town”

Ayling Stores Order Book

A1d 89 424 circa 1910 Individuals may well be Aylings

A rare and fascinating relic of Shoreham’s commercial past is this 1908 receipt book provided by Henry Ayling & Sons for their customers. Aylings were family grocers, drapers and furnishers at 54/56 High Street on the western corner with John Street. Henry Ayling born 1838, a master grocer from Midhurst and his wife Fanny arrived in Shoreham during the mid/late 1860’s after acquiring the premises.

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Blockade Coastguard Station

Description: Blockhouse Beach Lawns Blockhouse

THE BLOCKADE/COASTGUARD STATION AT SHOREHAM

The Blockade (or “Preventative”) Service was created in 1817 following the country’s huge loss of revenue due to what was then considered by some to be a lack of success by the Customs and Revenue Services in coping with the smuggling problem. It is perhaps unfair to lay the blame for this entirely upon them as, amongst other things, we know that manpower was short compared with the smuggling gangs they came up against; pay was poor and even the ships they used were invariably slower and less well armed than the smugglers’ own vessels. Continue reading “Blockade Coastguard Station”

A Small Book of Letters

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The early 19 th century letters of a Shoreham Resident

 

Contents

Page 1 – 2 Introduction

Page 3 – 4 Letter A (transcript)

Page 4 Letter B ( .. )

Page 5 Letter C ( .. )

Page 5 – 6 Letter D ( .. )

Page 6 – 7 Letter E ( .. )

Page 7 – 9 Letter F ( .. )

Page 9 – 10 Letter G ( .. )

Page 10 – 12 Notes H ( .. )

 

The Original Papers

 

Page 13 Front cover, inside front cover and first page (letter A)

Page 14 Second and third pages (letter A continued)

Fourth and fifth pages (letter A concluded and start of letter B)

Page 15 Sixth and seventh pages (letter B concluded and start of letter C)

Eighth and ninth pages (letter C concluded and start of letter D)

Page 16 Tenth and eleventh pages (letter D continued)

Twelfth and thirteenth pages (letter D concluded ad start of letter E)

Page 17 Fourteenth and fifteenth pages (letter E concluded and start of letter F)

Sixteenth and seventeenth pages (letter F continued)

Page 18 Eighteenth and nineteenth pages (letter F continued)

Twentieth and twentyfirst pages (letter F concluded and start of letter G)

Page 19 Twentysecond and twentythird pages (letter G concluded and notes H)

 

A Small Book of Letters and Notes by William Butler (circa 1816)

 

This beautifully written book (not much more than a few pages eight and a half by six inches sewn together ) discovered recently under the floor boards during renovations at No.22, Church Street transpire to be the writings of William Butler whilst serving on board the Revenue Cutter ‘The Hound’. The Butler family of that time is vividly described in detail by Maria Butler in her history of that family shortly before her tragic death at 27 in 1857.There were possibly more than two William Butlers from Shoreham living at this time but the most likely candidates were baptised in 1760 and 1795. The former, who would have been 56 at the time, is not seriously considered to be a candidate for the author of these writings (A) in view of the author’s exploits which will be revealed later (although it could have been possible), and (B) because he is not mentioned at all by Maria in her notes. Furthermore, since his baptism, this older William does not appear again in the parish records, even for burial, so it is assumed that he had moved away and died elsewhere.

 

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The Opening of the Shoreham Branch Railway

Trestle Bridge

The Opening of the Shoreham Branch Railway Line 1840

It is not generally appreciated (except by railway history enthusiasts) that before the formation of the London, Brighton and South Coast Railway proper (1846), the railway line to Shoreham (initially the line ended here and was not extended to Worthing until 1845) was the first part of the then London & Brighton Railway to be opened (1840) for traffic – one year before the line from Brighton to Haywards Heath and eventually to London. Continue reading “The Opening of the Shoreham Branch Railway”