Blind Fanny Winton

Blind Fanny Winton

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I’ve known about Old Shoreham’s blind Fanny Winton for many years but never got round to reading Martha Rigden’s account in her 1873 book ‘By A Way They Knew Not.’

In clearing some old papers recently I discovered this anonymous resume of the book that condenses Fanny’s story of a hard life, going blind, travelling to Brighton for (somewhat harsh) treatment, bedridden for 30 years etc., and also tells us a little of the area and the people in it.

Continue reading “Blind Fanny Winton”

William Edward Winton

William Edward Winton – bill poster, printer, photographer, impresario.

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William Winton as a young man around 1870

Captain Henry Roberts R.N. who sailed round the world with Captain Cook, John Brown the well known Victorian town notary and Henry Cheal the historian were all celebrated sons of Shoreham. To these names should be added William Edward Winton whose colourful life and work during the first half of the last century brought enjoyment to many Shoreham residents and, through his photos, continues to do so today. Continue reading “William Edward Winton”

Memories of Shoreham by Sea

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– a 1940’s/50’s childhood in Connaught Avenue and West Street

I was born in Connaught Avenue, Old Shoreham parish in 1938 and apart from the war years, lived and grew up in Old Shoreham. In 1946 the front gardens were still planted with vegetables. The big air raid shelter was in position on the green that separated the even number houses on the north side of the road from the odds on the south side. Orchard Close had not been built and the land was owned by the Worley family. Continue reading “Memories of Shoreham by Sea”

The Saving of Marlipins

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The Marlipins building is generally accepted as a monument of considerable historic importance. It is hard to believe now that during the early 1920’s it was in danger of being demolished and only saved due to the generosity of donors, the co-operation of the owner and the efforts of many individuals. Of the latter there were two men in particular who provided the impetus not only to preserve the building but also to set it up as the town’s own museum. Continue reading “The Saving of Marlipins”

Shoreham Harbour 1875

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(a pamphlet recording a speech at the meeting of the trustees)

John Jabez Edwin Mayall 17 Sept 1813 – 6 March 1901

On Tuesday July 20th 1875, Alderman Mayall, having been appointed by the Brighton Corporation to be one of the trustees of the Shoreham Harbour Board, gave a speech at a meeting of the trustees at the Dolphin Chambers, Shoreham, where he laid out his plan to get a new bill passed through Government to allow the port greater borrowing powers in order to make the most of Shoreham Harbour’s potential.   Continue reading “Shoreham Harbour 1875”

Bungalow Town and the Beach at Shoreham between the Wars

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The reminiscences of Bessie Bailey and her daughter Peggy

Foreword: – In the early 1920’s much of the Beach was still undeveloped and the bungalows and houses that were there were spread along the seafront with little or nothing behind except in Ferry Road. There was no electricity, gas, or mains drainage; water was brought from the mainland in a large zinc cistern and sold at 2p a bucket to supplement the rainwater collected in storage tanks. The houses were given bizarre names rather than numbers. Continue reading “Bungalow Town and the Beach at Shoreham between the Wars”

Shoreham Football Club

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Early football in Shoreham and the ‘Glory Years’

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Today’s Shoreham Football Club was founded in 1892 playing competitive matches in the West Sussex Football League as from 1896, the Sussex Senior Challenge Cup competition that had been run since 1882 and the Royal Ulster Rifles Charity Cup (originally the Royal Irish Rifles Challenge Cup) a competition that was begun in 1897. Continue reading “Shoreham Football Club”

The Shoreham Ferrymen’s Treat

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Before the footbridge was built access to the beach was gained either by a long walk through town and over the Norfolk suspension bridge or, for a penny, a short ride across the river in one of the rowing boats operated by a group of ferrymen between Dolphin Hard (the eastern end of Coronation Green) and the south side of the river. In 1901 the Shoreham Workhouse was moved to new premises at Southlands and the original building at Ham Road became the St. Wilfrid’s children’s home. The children there were either from families who could no longer care for them or came from a deprived background – a situation that was recognised with sympathy by many in the town. Continue reading “The Shoreham Ferrymen’s Treat”