Blind Fanny Winton

Blind Fanny Winton

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I’ve known about Old Shoreham’s blind Fanny Winton for many years but never got round to reading Martha Rigden’s account in her 1873 book ‘By A Way They Knew Not.’

In clearing some old papers recently I discovered this anonymous resume of the book that condenses Fanny’s story of a hard life, going blind, travelling to Brighton for (somewhat harsh) treatment, bedridden for 30 years etc., and also tells us a little of the area and the people in it.

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Wall Advertisements

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19th Century Wall Advertisements in John Street

During the 19th and early 20th centuries it was common practice for the commercial areas of most towns and cities to have advertisements painted on the walls of business premises and shops, some were of a high quality, almost works of art. Over the years since most signs have disappeared through overpainting or weather erosion but some still remain. Nowadays they are more appreciated for their historic and artistic value and efforts tend to be made to preserve them. Commonly known now as ghost signs they once appeared most everywhere in Shoreham’s High Street but less so on premises in side streets such as the Beehive pub in North Street and the Burrell Arms Hotel in Brunswick Road. Continue reading “Wall Advertisements”

Stow & Son Yachts

ST1

Thomas Stow & Son Yachts 1866 – 1936,

Courtney & Birkett and Francis Suter

 

During the late 19th and early 20th centuries Thomas Stow & Son earned themselves a reputation internationally as a respected designer and builder of good quality luxury racing yachts and other types of boat at their shipyard on the river at Shoreham. In his book ‘The Ships and Mariners of Shoreham historian Henry Cheal lists some of their schooners, yawls, luggers and cutters. These were of high quality, well planned internally to give them a ‘roominess’ rarely matched by other makers. Besides supplying private customers Stows also built many of the boats that carried British troops up the river Nile for the 1884 Sudan Expedition. Continue reading “Stow & Son Yachts”

War Hawk

Montague Dawson artist - possible copyright but take a chance with Herald use copy

It often amazes me that a website for a small town like Shoreham attracts visitors from around the world including particularly Australia, America and Canada. One though was especially surprising coming as it did from Estonia and concerned a rather special Shoreham built ship. Continue reading “War Hawk”

The Royal Sovereign

Main photo:- Harry Bish, landlord from 1917 to 1932, stands in the old doorway set into today’s Royal Sovereign

Built around the 1750’s it is first recorded as a tenement and garden in 1782 owned by Richard Lashmar and occupied by John and Sarah Purse. Ann Foster, a Church Street resident and landlady of a number of rented houses, then acquired the property letting it out to Thomas Carver during the 1820’s and 30’s. Continue reading “The Royal Sovereign”

Rope and Sail Makers

-the Tillstone and English families

 

“…… the shouts of the workers, the creak of the rope and winches, the ringing of the signal bells and the pervading smell of tar must have left a strong impression on the senses.”

 

Rope and sail making has been an important part of Shoreham’s shipbuilding industry for hundreds of years but it is only during the 18th and 19th centuries that we know more of the men and their families involved.

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Napoleonic Army Camps

Military copy

During the Napoleonic Wars the threat of invasion by the French caused Britain to strengthen its defences along the south coast in readiness. Initially, more troops were redeployed to the south followed later by other defensive precautions such as the Martello Towers that were built along the Kent and East Sussex coasts. Barracks and camps were set up, most were intended only as temporary accommodation for the troops but the one along the Lewes Road near Brighton became permanent and survived into the 20th century as Preston Barracks. There were others further inland but the local coastal camps were at Blatchington (Hove), Southwick, Steyning, New Shoreham and Worthing. Continue reading “Napoleonic Army Camps”