Old Market House and Election Stones

Macintosh HD:Users:rogerbateman:Desktop:Back Up Articles, Photos Etc.,:SNIPPETS:Market House Posts:1. Detail from the 1789 map showing 'B' the site of the market house and 'C' the stone (note; not stones). .jpg
Detail from the 1789 map showing ‘B’ the site of the market house and ‘C’ the stone

The Market House

Shoreham historian Henry Cheal tells us that following the great storm of 1703 that blew down the town’s original market house another was built in its stead in 1711 on 10 columns and stood opposite the Crown and Anchor pub.The new market house was described as having consisted of ‘an oblong canopy of freestone (a fine grained stone, usually sandstone or limestone) embellished with gothic ornaments, supported by ten columns’ and was ‘a fine piece of architecture.’ Was it merely a canopy or roof supported on columns – maybe not as Cheal refers to the new building as a market house? It was itself later removed and replaced by another market house contemptuously described as ‘a mean building of brick,’ in East Street near the New Road junction in 1823. From there we are told it was taken to the island at the bottom of Southdown Road where it would have been a landmark seen by the crowds on their way from the station to the popular Swiss Gardens.

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Royal Sovereign Pub

The Royal Sovereign Pub

A short history

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The ghost of Harry Bish, landlord from 1917 to 1932, stands in the old doorway

 

Built around the 1750’s it is first recorded as a tenement and garden in 1782 owned by John and Sarah Purse  and occupied by Richard Lashmar. Ann Foster, a Church Street resident and landlady of a number of rented houses, then acquired the property letting it out to William Lashmar during the 1820’s and 30’s.

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Napoleonic Army Camps

Military copy

During the Napoleonic Wars the threat of invasion by the French caused Britain to strengthen its defences along the south coast in readiness. Initially, more troops were redeployed to the south followed later by other defensive precautions such as the Martello Towers that were built along the Kent and East Sussex coasts. Barracks and camps were set up, most were intended only as temporary accommodation for the troops but the one along the Lewes Road near Brighton became permanent and survived into the 20th century as Preston Barracks. There were others further inland but the local coastal camps were at Blatchington (Hove), Southwick, Steyning, New Shoreham and Worthing. Continue reading “Napoleonic Army Camps”

Vault in Church Street

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Survey of the old Vault in Church Street

Documentary Records.

 

Described as a ‘Capital Messuage in 1738, the land within which the vaults are situated was owned by the Smith family and then, in 1782, passed to the Bridgers. However, the description of the property whilst mentioning ‘two tenements, malthouse, garden, stables, coach house and coachyard (which included the land and buildings southwards from the Manor House down to – but not including — the old Custom House and west [behind] the latter.) does not mention a vault or cellar at all. Continue reading “Vault in Church Street”

John Butler’s 1786 Sketch of Shoreham Examined

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(click to enlarge image)

 

The story of Captain John Butler has already been extensively described in Maria Butler’s family history ‘Memories of a Shoreham Seafaring Family’ but this circa 1786 sketch shows another side of his talents. The naive character of some of the buildings, St.Mary’s church etc., in the drawing may suggest that he was not an especially gifted artist and many have thought that his representation of Shoreham is not altogether realistic. Continue reading “John Butler’s 1786 Sketch of Shoreham Examined”