Author Topic: Learning to fly at Shoreham 1916  (Read 168 times)

Snapper41

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Learning to fly at Shoreham 1916
« on: October 16, 2019, 08:52:52 am »
Good morning all

I am currently researching someone who learnt to fly with 3 Reserve Squadron at Shoreham in April 1916, and am wondering what sort of aeroplane he would have learned in?

Thank you

Snapper

Doug Attrell

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Re: Learning to fly at Shoreham 1916
« Reply #1 on: October 16, 2019, 10:21:05 am »
Most likely the Maurice Farman Shorthorn.



I found an article on 3 Reserve Squadron here --> https://www.apw.airwar1.org.uk/3rs.htm

Gerry White

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Re: Learning to fly at Shoreham 1916
« Reply #2 on: October 16, 2019, 03:55:08 pm »
 Air Vice Marshal  Gould in his book Open Cockpit, said that he learnt to fly at Shoreham which was the location during WW1  of the RFC South East Area Flying School He flew the Maurice Farman shorthorn However, I looked up RFC N0 3 Reserve Squadron location in 1916, it was based at Netheravon Wilts. He was probably detached to Shoreham . for the duration of his basic course.

Lofty

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Re: Learning to fly at Shoreham 1916
« Reply #3 on: October 16, 2019, 05:19:49 pm »
Almost certainly the Maurice Farman.

The following information has been taken from the book "Sussex Flights and Fliers" by Roy Brooks (1992).

At the outbreak of WW1, RFC flying training was initially provided by civilian flying schools.   At Shoreham, this service was provided by the Pashley Brothers up until the end of December 1914 when the aerodrome was taken over by the RFC.

On 15th January 1915, No3 Reserve Squadron was set up at Shoreham to teach the basics of flying up to the level of the RAeC brevet tests.  After this, the pilots would move on to the new squadrons and take their RFC "Wings" at the Central Flying School at Upavon.  The aeroplanes flown at Shoreham were Maurice Farmans with 70hp engines.
Most of the instructors and pupils lived on Shoreham Beach, where one of the bungalows, Pandora, was used as the officer's mess.

In January 1917, No 3 Reserve Squadron at Shoreham was transferred to the Eastern Command Group and was re-named as No 3 Training Squadron.  New pilots were now given a six-week course of flying training, with a minimum of 3 hours dual and 3 hours solo.   By mid-summer 1917 the training aircraft had all been upgraded, being replaced with Avro 504K's.
 
As an aside, if you want to read a first hand account of flying training at Shoreham during WW1, I can recommend the book "Wind in the Wires" by Duncan Grinnell-Milne. I managed to borrow a copy from my local library.
« Last Edit: October 17, 2019, 11:14:32 am by Lofty »
Lofty

Nelson

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Re: Learning to fly at Shoreham 1916
« Reply #4 on: October 17, 2019, 08:15:41 am »
Actual reminiscences of learning to fly with the RFC at Shoreham, extracts from Grinnell-Milne’s ‘Wind in the Wires’ and other trainees with the RFC at Shoreham (including Oswald Mosley) here http://www.shorehambysea.com/canvas-wood-wire/ 

Snapper41

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Re: Learning to fly at Shoreham 1916
« Reply #5 on: October 17, 2019, 08:20:32 am »
Many thanks everyone - very helpful indeed