Show Posts

This section allows you to view all posts made by this member. Note that you can only see posts made in areas you currently have access to.


Messages - Doug Attrell

Pages: [1] 2
1
Shoreham Discussion / Re: Greenways Crescent
« on: June 23, 2020, 08:54:02 pm »
Very interesting. I've been waiting for someone to reply before adding my two penn'orth.
I'm wondering if it was something to do with WWII defences. More details are visible on this aerial photo dated 1946.
http://www.sussex.ac.uk/geography/researchprojects/airphotos-historic/1940/index.html?COL=12+ROW=18+ZOOM=e+GPSX=-1+GPSY=-1

I've cropped & enlarged it from the original photo

2
Shoreham Discussion / Re: Railway Air Services Survivors
« on: March 31, 2020, 09:01:07 am »
Some interesting updates there guys, than you.
Thanks to you & Spinalman for keeping this forum running. ;)

Thanks for the information Lofty. I found another photo of G-ECAN. This one was taken at Sywell in 2014.

3
Shoreham Discussion / Re: Railway Air Services Survivors
« on: March 30, 2020, 09:17:59 am »
Interesting article Lofty. Here's a photo of a Dragon I took at Popham airfield on New Year's Day back in 2010.
This one was built in 1943 by DH Australia for the RAAF. It was later converted to civilian standards & flew for Marshall Airways from September 1946 & used for air ambulance, charter and passenger charter flights. It was restored in the 90's following an accident before being imported into the UK in 2001. At the time of my photo it was in immaculate Railway Air Services livery with the previously unissued period registration G-ECAN. I'm not sure where it is now or if it's still airworthy.


4
Interesting. Is this what you're looking for? Eastbourne Aerodrome

5
Shoreham Discussion / Re: Learning to fly at Shoreham 1916
« on: October 16, 2019, 10:21:05 am »
Most likely the Maurice Farman Shorthorn.



I found an article on 3 Reserve Squadron here --> https://www.apw.airwar1.org.uk/3rs.htm

6
Shoreham Discussion / Re: Horsham Flyer
« on: September 29, 2019, 11:26:52 am »
Excellent! It certainly brought back a few memories for me. I travelled on the "Stinker" between Shoreham & Steyning every school day for several years during the 1950s.

We didn't realise at the time that it was unusual by using the 'push-pull' system whereby the train could be controlled from either end depending on the direction of travel. The fireman naturally remained in the loco whichever end of the train it was.
The image below shows the control cab in the front/rear coach (courtesy of the Bluebell Railway website). http://www.bluebell-railway-museum.co.uk/archive/newsletter/079/newsletter.htm


7
Shoreham Discussion / Re: The Cinemas in Shoreham
« on: September 03, 2019, 05:23:07 pm »
I hope that you were not involved in any seat ripping incidents !  ::)
Nah, we were good lads. 8)

As I recall we found the whole thing rather disappointing after all the publicity. Much ado about nothing methinks. ???

8
Shoreham Discussion / Re: The Cinemas in Shoreham
« on: September 02, 2019, 12:31:20 pm »
I went to the Ritz with some friends to see Rock Around the Clock as it was banned in Lancing & Worthing.
This would have been around 1956, soon after it was released. Happy days. 8)

9
I joined 1440 Squadron in 1956 & was a keen member for several years, attaining the then new rank of Cadet Warrant Officer before leaving. The C/O was F/Lt Goldfinch. During that time I attended annual camps at RAF Topcliffe, Swinderby & finally Chivenor in Devon where I was lucky enough to have a flight in a Hawker Hunter T.7 *, breaking the so-called 'sound barrier' twice over Lundy Island. Earlier that year I gained my A & B Gliding Certificate at RAF Hawkinge in Kent, the famous BoB fighter airfield. 1959 was a good year for me. 8)

Our HQ during my time was part of the TA HQ in Eastern Avenue. When I first joined we even had our own Spitfire, not really ours but belonging to the Brighton & Hove RAFA. This was a late model Spitfire Mk 22 (PK481) which at the time was painted all silver.  It was a bit dilapidated due to being stored in the open air unprotected. Needless to say we were strictly forbidden to touch it.

In 1958 'Our Spit' was sold to the RAAF Association, Perth, Australia where for some years it was displayed on a pole outside their HQ. It now has pride of place inside the RAAF Association Aviation Heritage Museum, Bull Creek.WA. http://www.warbirdsonline.com.au/2017/10/16/supermarine-spitfire-mk22-raf-pk481/

* Sadly the same type that crashed at Shoreham in 2015.  :'(

10
There were two bolts sticking up above the centre of the wings, one on each side.  When I enquired to our tour guide as to what these were for, he explained that these were attached to the undercarriage and would disappear into the wing when the plane was flying.  When landing, the pilot would look out of the cockpit and if he could see these bolts sticking up then he knew that the undercarriage was down.   To this day I am still not sure whether he was pulling my leg or not.   Probably not.
Not pulling your leg at all.  Some marks of Spitfire had a similar mechanical indicator. Also other WWII aircraft including the Messerschmitt Bf 109. Simple but effective.

The attached image is copied from the Spitfire IIa & IIb Pilot's Notes.



11
Shoreham Discussion / Re: British History On Line
« on: June 26, 2019, 10:21:57 am »
An excellent resource. Thank you! 8)

12
Shoreham Discussion / Re: Old Words and Meanings
« on: May 27, 2019, 11:46:24 am »
The English language has always fascinated me. Of course it is continually evolving but I prefer the old English I was taught at school compared with the modern words & phrases which have come into common usage during my lifetime.

It is  strange to see how the use of 'f ' which is now 's' has been dropped,perhaps it was the confusion when writing a word which had a double 's'...for example the word 'miss' in the old days would have been written 'mifs' before the 'f' for 's' was dropped !
The f that johnjohn refers to is actually a long s which is an f without the crossbar. Very confusing which is no doubt why it is no longer used. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Long_s

13
Shoreham Discussion / Re: Who had my railings ?
« on: February 05, 2019, 08:49:15 am »
This is most likely what happened to them. Park Railings For Munitions

Aluminium pots & pans were also collected under the slogan "Saucepans to Spitfires". Whether the resulting huge amount of scrap metal was actually any use is debatable. However, it was a good propaganda exercise. http://www.londongardenstrust.org/features/railings3.htm

14
Shoreham Discussion / Re: No - it can't be!
« on: October 08, 2018, 11:00:31 am »
Interesting. I'm wondering if they could be Bessonneau hangars.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bessonneau_hangar

15
Shoreham Discussion / Re: Some of the Airport's More Eccentric Aircraft
« on: September 06, 2018, 05:34:24 pm »
Quote
Lofty, that uncovered view reminds me so much of the balsa wood flying models we used to make. I suppose in their construction they were quite like the early 1900's aircraft.
They're still like it today. Here's a cutaway drawing of the RV-14, the latest in the popular range of Van's light aircraft.
https://www.vansaircraft.com/images/RV-14/RV-14_Cutaway_lg.jpg
(The apostrophe in the company name is correct.) https://www.vansaircraft.com/public/rv14.htm

Although this example is of all-metal construction instead of wood, the basic layout hasn't changed since the earliest days of powered flight.

Pages: [1] 2