Maps

1622 Shoreham to Lancing Marshes Map – Although lacking in some detail and is incomplete (the original has the extreme west part missing) this is probably one of the earliest large scale maps of the area. Surveyed and drawn by George Randoll , presumably for the then owners of the land, it came into the hands of the Petworth Estate in 1784 when they purchased Pad Farm and some of the marshes. It shows the main course of the river around Old and New Shoreham. Unusually orientated north to south it covers the area from Well Dyke (near today’s Sussex Pad site) to the ‘Stoane Beatche’ (which shows the build up of the Shoreham Beach spit or peninsula – this is thought to have been long established and even by the 17th century the river is believed to have entered the sea as far west as Southwick). From east to west the map originally covered from Shoreham to Worthing Gate (map piece missing – now known as Teville Gate). Text in the top left corner refers to the submerged village of Pende reads ‘In this place being distant from the shore in the sea (axer?) could wales (rocks) to be (seen?) at low water which are commonly called axaparte – the old name for Pende. A ferry is shown at Old Shoreham where the toll bridge is now – the Lancing and Well Dyke ‘shoppes’ were, of course , workshops. Were these offshoots of the river man made for drainage or naturally formed? Apart from the main river little or nothing of them in their original position remains now although the section from ‘Salte Mershes’ opposite Old Shoreham down to ‘Lyttel Iland’ seems to have survived up to 1780 alongside a road through what is now the airport (Map5a) and although that road can still be seen on the 1912 map (Map12b) the ditch itself has disappeared.

Reproduced by permission of Lord Egremont.

 

Ship Arrivals & Departures 1837-1842.

A selection of newspaper cuttings providing  five year example of ship movements in and out of Shoreham port during the 19th century. The ship’s name is followed by the surname of the captain then the port sailed from or to. From early 1840 the cargo carried is also given.

The British Library Newspaper Archive is a massive and absolutely fascinating resource and thanks must go them for their permission in allowing these images to be reproduced (www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk). Please also note that in copyright images belong to Northcliffe Media Limited and out of copyright images belong to The British Library. Continue reading “Ship Arrivals & Departures 1837-1842.”

V1 Flying Bombs at Shoreham

It turns out that three past and present Shoreham residents Brian Bazen, Denis Turrell and I are linked in a surprising set of coincidences. Earlier this year I was looking through Bob Hill’s collection of Old Shoreham photographs (he wrote the booklets ‘Old Shoreham Village & Farms’) in Marlipins Museum and found one of a V1 flying bomb (they were known generally as doodlebugs) that was taken through a window.

Part of the Bob Hill Collection

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Old Market House and Election Stones

Macintosh HD:Users:rogerbateman:Desktop:Back Up Articles, Photos Etc.,:SNIPPETS:Market House Posts:1. Detail from the 1789 map showing 'B' the site of the market house and 'C' the stone (note; not stones). .jpg
Detail from the 1789 map showing ‘B’ the site of the market house and ‘C’ the stone

The Market House

Shoreham historian Henry Cheal tells us that following the great storm of 1703 that blew down the town’s original market house another was built in its stead in 1711 on 10 columns and stood opposite the Crown and Anchor pub.The new market house was described as having consisted of ‘an oblong canopy of freestone (a fine grained stone, usually sandstone or limestone) embellished with gothic ornaments, supported by ten columns’ and was ‘a fine piece of architecture.’ Was it merely a canopy or roof supported on columns – maybe not as Cheal refers to the new building as a market house? It was itself later removed and replaced by another market house contemptuously described as ‘a mean building of brick,’ in East Street near the New Road junction in 1823. From there we are told it was taken to the island at the bottom of Southdown Road where it would have been a landmark seen by the crowds on their way from the station to the popular Swiss Gardens.

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